Abstract

The question of women and Islam has attracted a lot of interest in academics. Concerns like how one understands the situation of women in a more patriarchal religion like Islam have taken centre in many debates. But sadly the experience of Muslim women is often seen as same with Muslim men or other women. Either gender over determines or community over determines the Muslim women’s question. Whatever work is done on Muslim women, religion is seen as dominating every aspect. While studying Muslim women, undue emphasis is given to Muslim personal law. There is also a tendency to homogenise the category of Muslim women.